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  • Health + Wellness Protocols 1: Introduction

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    This introduction will provide the background for designers to lead the conversation with their clients about the benefits of healthy interior spaces and how design strategies can impact health outcomes.

    Building owners and occupants are now focusing on the built environment impacts human health, and the evidence is clear. This introduction module will provide the background for designers to lead the conversation with their clients about the benefits of healthy interior spaces and how design strategies can impact health outcomes. 

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify ways in which interior spaces, buildings, and exterior spaces can affect human health.
    2. Define the components of health: physical health, mental health, and wellness.
    3. Describe benefits of healthier homes, offices, schools, and healthcare facilities.
    4. Describe key elements of the Health + Wellness Protocols.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105812; 0.1 CEU | HSW   Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDHWP101; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Health + Wellness Protocols 3: Interiors, Materials

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    This third Health + Wellness Protocols module will give you an overview of the processes and tools needed to select healthier materials.

    Today, clients are becoming increasingly aware of the health impacts of their homes and buildings. They want to be confident that their interior spaces support the health of the people who live and work in them. Clients want materials that are safe and sustainable, and that meet the health standards as certified by credible third-party organizations. They rely on designers and architects for advice on navigating this complex field.

    This third Health + Wellness Protocols module will give you an overview of the processes and tools needed to select healthier materials.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify the substances of concern found in building materials and their associated health impacts.
    2. Identify methods for evaluating materials and define the concepts of hazard, exposure, toxicity and risk.
    3. Identify resources and tools to guide selection of healthy materials, and
    4. Describe healthy material considerations and strategies for their selection.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105814; 0.1 CEU | HSW  Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDHWPM; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Health + Wellness Protocols 5: Interiors, Components

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    In this final Health + Wellness Protocols module, we will examine building components that shape our interior environments

    Access to good air, light and water is essential to human health. So is access to a supportive built environment. Components make up a building’s envelope and interior elements, vital parts of a building’s major systems, and the technologies that “connect” us and assist occupants in operating the space in an efficient, healthy manner. 

    In this final Health + Wellness Protocols module, we will examine building components that shape our interior environments and how designers can select components to improve the air we breathe, the water we drink and our access to sunlight and views, which are the hallmarks of the general health and safety of interior spaces. 

    Learning Objectives

    1. Identify building envelope components at the building scale and interior scale that support healthy indoor environments.
    2. Describe how air moves through a building and methods to improve indoor air quality.
    3. Describe strategies to improve the positive impacts of light quality in an interior space.
    4. Identify strategies to improve water quality and use water more efficiently.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105815; 0.1 CEU | HSW   Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDHWP105; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Health + Wellness Protocols 2: Interiors, Foundational Concepts

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    This second Health + Wellness Protocols module will introduce interior designers and architects to the baseline information necessary to understand this growing health and wellness approach to design practice.

    This second module in the Health + Wellness Protocols series will introduce interior designers and architects to the baseline information necessary to understand this growing health and wellness approach to design practice. It describes market opportunities for healthier interiors and buildings and the benefits to design professionals of developing expertise in this growing field. Participants will learn about the major body systems that affect physical health, mental health, and wellness, as well as design opportunities that can promote health of these systems. The module introduces core topics that designers need to understand to select materials, products, and components that support healthier interiors. Finally, the module discusses an integrative design approach that designers can take when working with clients and other professionals to optimize the health performance of interiors and buildings. 

    Learning Objectives

    1. Describe the purpose of the Health + Wellness Protocols and the benefits to interior designers of developing expertise in health and wellness design.
    2. Identify the major body systems that contribute to health and well-being and how interior spaces can affect them.
    3. Describe core topics that designers need to understand to design heathier interiors.
    4. Develop critical thinking skills around a design process for interior solutions that enhance health and well-being.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105813; 0.1 CEU | HSW  Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDHWP102; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Health + Wellness Protocols 4: Interiors, Products

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    This fourth Health + Wellness Protocols module will explore products that enhance the health of a space, including furnishings, lighting fixtures, plumbing fixtures, appliances and cleaning products.

    Emerging research reveals an alarming trend: people’s health and sense of well-being are in decline throughout the world. This global issue poses a significant risk for employers: poor health and well-being among workers reduces performance and productivity. For employers that provide healthcare benefits, it also contributes to escalating cost burdens.

    Nearly 70 percent of health care costs are due to preventable conditions, and new research confirms that spending long hours sitting down while commuting and working can play a significant role in the development of chronic disease. More than ever, worker well-being is a good business for designers.

    In this fourth Health + Wellness Protocols module, we will explore products that enhance the health of a space, including furnishings, lighting fixtures, plumbing fixtures, appliances and cleaning products.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Recognize how furnishings can support human health and wellness through active design, ergonomic and stress reducing strategies.
    2. Identify ways to use and optimize lighting products to promote comfortable work environments.
    3. Discover how to select plumbing fixtures and appliances for their sustainable, assistive and inclusive features.
    4. Communicate strategies to implement comprehensive cleaning protocols and use cleaning products to support clean, healthy interiors.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105811; 0.1 CEU | HSW  Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDHWP104; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Health Safety and Welfare versus Health and Wellness

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    This session will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on this issue.

    This session will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on this issue. This seminar was recorded as part of the 2015 Impact Summit.

    Central discussion: Most workplace accidents are preventable and can be traced to employee error. When employees are educated and motivated to improve their health, they are less likely to cause an accident at work, or to be involved in one. Likewise, safety is negatively affected by employees who are less than healthy, due to a wide variety of issues, such as: lack of sleep, high stress, reduced physical fitness, working with an illness or injury, inattention and distraction, and inadequate indoor environmental quality.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Consider the challenges and opportunities in current Health Safety and Welfare codes supporting human health and wellness in the built environment.
    2. Explore pathways for technology and design to increase employee participation in safety initiatives, while further integrating wellness initiatives.
    3. Compare how higher education, credentialing and licensing requirements will be impacted by the emerging changes to design practice due to heightened focus on health and wellness.
    4. Recognize cross-sector terminology related to health and wellness oriented design.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105683R1; 0.1 CEU | HSW    Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Healthy Materials Sourcing and Selection

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    Learn key questions and considerations to specify healthy materials for your projects, including how to recognize materials that could be harmful to human health and how to find alternatives.

    After taking this course, you’ll be able to recognize materials that could be harmful to human health, and know how to find alternatives when specifying.Dr. Andrew Dent of Material ConneXion will walk you through scenarios to illustrate areas of concern and provide examples of situations where healthful alternatives are necessary. You’ll learn key questions to ask and how to navigate ratings and points systems to evaluate materials’ impact on human health.

    Learning objectives:

    • Recognize materials that could be harmful to human health
    • Find alternatives to unhealthy materials
    • Understand the importance of ratings and points systems and how and when to use them
    • Know the key questions to ask when specifying healthy materials

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-108108; 0.1 CEU | HSW  Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: HLTHMAT18; 1 LU|HSW

    Access period: One year from registration date.c

    Andrew Dent, Ph.D.

    Executive Vice President of Research, Material ConneXion

    Dr. Andrew Dent is Executive Vice President of Research at Material ConneXion, and Chief Material Scientist at SANDOW. He plays a key role in the expansion of Material ConneXion’s technical knowledge base. His research directs the implementation of consulting projects and the selection of innovative, sustainable and advanced materials to Material ConneXion’s library, which currently houses over 8,000 material samples. Since joining Material Connexion, Dr. Dent has helped hundreds of clients—from Whirlpool and Adidas to BMW and Procter & Gamble—develop or improve their products through the use of innovative materials. A leading expert on sustainable materials, his insight has played an important part in creating a new generation of more sustainable products. He is a frequent speaker on sustainable and innovative material strategies and is the co-author of the Material Innovation books series, which, to date, includes Material Innovation: Architecture, Material Innovation: Product Design and Material Innovation: Packaging Design. Dr. Dent has also contributed to many magazines including Business Week, Fast Company and the Financial Times.  

     

  • Integration of the Disciplines: Is Integrative Design the Key to Health and Wellness Success?

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    This session will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on integrated design.

    This session will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on this issue. This seminar was recorded as part of the 2015 Impact Summit.

    Central Discussion: Integrated design is a holistic method of design which emphasizes management empathy to promote innovation by exploiting different skills to enhance the synergies of the final deliverable interior or building. An integrated design process includes the active and continuing participation of users and community members, code officials, building technologists, contractors, cost consultants, civil engineers, mechanical and electrical engineers, structural engineers, specifications specialists, and consultants from many specialized fields. However, who will lead this charge? What is the call to action? How do various stakeholders get buy-in?

    Learning Objectives

    1. Determine approaches for health and wellness in design to augment project return on investment.
    2. Discuss common barriers that are preventing effective integration among practitioners, specialists, clients and occupants.
    3. Understand the challenges and opportunities in achieving high-quality results and accountability through integrated design.
    4. Recognize cross-sector terminology related to health and wellness oriented design.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105684; 0.1 CEU | HSW    Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Personalized Learning, Personalized Space: Design Implications for Personalized Learning

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    Explore what personalized learning means to students and teachers, and learn practical design guidelines you can implement to create environments for personalized learning.

    Personalized learning promotes students’ greater autonomy by offering individualized curricula based on capabilities and interests, enhancing academic achievement. In this presentation you’ll walk through an exploration of what personalized learning means to students and teachers, then review the efficacy of a recent school renovation designed to implement personalized learning. Next you’ll review an experimental sensory design lab, covering development and pilot testing, focusing on furniture selection and arrangement. You’ll finish with practical design guidelines you can implement to create environments for personalized learning.  Development of the sensory design lab was funded by the ASID Foundation Transform Grant.

    Learning Objectives:

    • To be able to define personalized learning and how it is related to the built environment
    • To be able to identify common challenges related to learning-environment design
    • To be able to address potential challenges in school design when adopting personalized learning paradigm
    • To be able to generate design implications for personalized learning

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-107925; 0.1 CEU    Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDPLPS; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

    Upali Nanda, PhD

    Director of Research, HKS

    Dr. Upali Nanda is the Director of Research for HKS, responsible for spearheading and implementing research projects globally. She also serves as the Executive Director for the non-profit Center for Advanced Design Research and Education. She is a member of the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture (ANFA) Advisory Council, the AIA Research Advisory for Design & Health, and the AAH research council. Her doctoral work on “Sensthetics” has been published as a book, and she has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and mainstream media. She has been the recipient of numerous national grants and awards. 

    Giyoung Park, PhD, AIA

    Senior Design Researcher, HKS

    Dr. Giyoung Park currently serves as a Senior Design Researcher at HKS Architects. Dr. Park is an environmental psychologist and registered architect. She has earned an M.Arch. degree from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Human-Environment Relations and a PhD in Human Behavior and Design degrees from Cornell University. Her research interests include environmental stress, social interaction, social capital, communication technologies and human wellbeing in relation to the built environment.

    Angela Ramer

    Design Anthropologist, HKS

    Angela Ramer  is design anthropologist at HKS Architects. She earned her M.S. in Applied Anthropology from The University of North and a B.A. in Anthropology from Elon University. Angela’s interests in business, technology and design relate to her current work in both organizational performance and design for corporate offices, educational environments, campus planning, sports and entertainment, and urban planning projects. Her user-centered, ethnographic perspective highlights for design team and clients alike the need to understand the breadth of human experience that occurs within and around built environments. 

    Ashley Flores

    Education Strategist, HKS

    Ashley Flores is the Education Strategist at HKS, a global architecture and design firm. She leverages her experience as teacher, district administrator, and planner to advance teaching and learning through the built environment. Prior to HKS, Ashley served as Director of Planning and Special Projects at the Dallas Independent School District and led the development and early implementation of the district's personalized learning initiative, a model for spurring innovation in a large urban district. She earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in the Business Honors Program and a Bachelor of Arts in the Plan II Honors Program at The University of Texas at Austin as well as a Master of Education in Education Policy and Management at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

  • Planning Ahead to Age at Home

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    Understand how homeowners can spend less money in the long term while aging in their homes by planning home upgrades that meet the Standards of Universal Design and Accessibility ahead of time.

    Research shows 73-88% of Baby Boomers in America want to age in their homes, yet few residences are prepared to accommodate long-term needs. This generation will live 10-15 years longer than previous generations, so Baby Boomers must stay healthy 10-15 years longer. To house healthier older adults, homes must accommodate physical needs for a lifetime. Preparing ahead is a key element in this equation. In today’s world, people are motivated by initiatives that save time, energy and money. People spend money in order to save money long term. This webinar focuses on how homeowners can spend less money in the long term while aging in their homes by planning home upgrades that meet the Standards of Universal Design and Accessibility ahead of time. A monetary value equation is presented, supporting that the most economical choice is to age in a home designed for multi-generational use. This research was made possible thanks to the ASID Foundation Irene Winifred Eno Grant

    Learning Objectives

    1. Learn about the long-term housing crisis generated by the extended life expectancy of healthy Baby Boomers
    2. Understand the predominant preference to age at home and the importance of planning ahead in order to prepare a lifelong multi-generational living environment
    3. Learn how to integrate the standards of Universal Design and Accessibility into the design elements of residential upgrades
    4. Discover the support systems needed by individuals to remain active in their communities while aging at home
    5. Review the key components of housing and healthcare presented as cost comparisons for aging at home versus aging in an assisted living facility

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-104947; 0.1 CEU | HSW     Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    Access periodOne year from registration date.

    Lisa Bonneville, FASID

    Principal, Bonneville Design

    Lisa Bonneville, FASID is a passionate interior designer with a vision to create an accessible world, one home at a time. For over 36 years, she has managed her award-winning firm, Bonneville Design, in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts, serving a residential, corporate, healthcare and retail clientele. She continues to work with many of her original clients, creating new homes for them through upgrades and careful planning on new construction to achieve lifelong living environments. Her inspired approach to the process of spatial planning and aesthetic impact provide fresh creative solutions on every project. She forms supportive teams, encourages collaboration, and improves outcomes by ensuring timely and transparent communication. This distinctive approach, coupled with a high level of organization and project management expertise, makes her a highly valued resource to her clients, vendors, and colleagues in the trade.

    Always a strong advocate for the physically and mentally challenged, Bonneville incorporates the standards of Universal Design into her project solutions and works with clients to heighten awareness of the importance of safety and mobility within the home while achieving optimum living environments for themselves, their family members, and friends. She is a 2014 recipient of the ASID Foundation’s Irene Winifred Eno Grant for the research project “Developing a Cost Comparison Tool for Planning Ahead to Age in a Home Designed to the Standards of Universal Design and Accessibility vs. Moving Into an Assisted Living Facility,” and in 2008 was inducted into the New England Design Hall of Fame. She’s the author of The Safe Home, Designing for Safety in the Home (2007).