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  • Integration of the Disciplines: Is Integrative Design the Key to Health and Wellness Success?

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    This session will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on integrated design.

    This session will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on this issue. This seminar was recorded as part of the 2015 Impact Summit.

    Central Discussion: Integrated design is a holistic method of design which emphasizes management empathy to promote innovation by exploiting different skills to enhance the synergies of the final deliverable interior or building. An integrated design process includes the active and continuing participation of users and community members, code officials, building technologists, contractors, cost consultants, civil engineers, mechanical and electrical engineers, structural engineers, specifications specialists, and consultants from many specialized fields. However, who will lead this charge? What is the call to action? How do various stakeholders get buy-in?

    Learning Objectives

    1. Determine approaches for health and wellness in design to augment project return on investment.
    2. Discuss common barriers that are preventing effective integration among practitioners, specialists, clients and occupants.
    3. Understand the challenges and opportunities in achieving high-quality results and accountability through integrated design.
    4. Recognize cross-sector terminology related to health and wellness oriented design.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105684; 1 CEU | HSW    Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Personalized Learning, Personalized Space: Design Implications for Personalized Learning

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    Explore what personalized learning means to students and teachers, and learn practical design guidelines you can implement to create environments for personalized learning.

    Personalized learning promotes students’ greater autonomy by offering individualized curricula based on capabilities and interests, enhancing academic achievement. In this presentation you’ll walk through an exploration of what personalized learning means to students and teachers, then review the efficacy of a recent school renovation designed to implement personalized learning. Next you’ll review an experimental sensory design lab, covering development and pilot testing, focusing on furniture selection and arrangement. You’ll finish with practical design guidelines you can implement to create environments for personalized learning.  Development of the sensory design lab was funded by the ASID Foundation Transform Grant.

    Learning Objectives:

    • To be able to define personalized learning and how it is related to the built environment
    • To be able to identify common challenges related to learning-environment design
    • To be able to address potential challenges in school design when adopting personalized learning paradigm
    • To be able to generate design implications for personalized learning

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-107925; 1 CEU    Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDPLPS; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

    Upali Nanda, PhD

    Director of Research, HKS

    Dr. Upali Nanda is the Director of Research for HKS, responsible for spearheading and implementing research projects globally. She also serves as the Executive Director for the non-profit Center for Advanced Design Research and Education. She is a member of the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture (ANFA) Advisory Council, the AIA Research Advisory for Design & Health, and the AAH research council. Her doctoral work on “Sensthetics” has been published as a book, and she has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and mainstream media. She has been the recipient of numerous national grants and awards. 

    Giyoung Park, PhD, AIA

    Senior Design Researcher, HKS

    Dr. Giyoung Park currently serves as a Senior Design Researcher at HKS Architects. Dr. Park is an environmental psychologist and registered architect. She has earned an M.Arch. degree from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Human-Environment Relations and a PhD in Human Behavior and Design degrees from Cornell University. Her research interests include environmental stress, social interaction, social capital, communication technologies and human wellbeing in relation to the built environment.

    Angela Ramer

    Design Anthropologist, HKS

    Angela Ramer  is design anthropologist at HKS Architects. She earned her M.S. in Applied Anthropology from The University of North and a B.A. in Anthropology from Elon University. Angela’s interests in business, technology and design relate to her current work in both organizational performance and design for corporate offices, educational environments, campus planning, sports and entertainment, and urban planning projects. Her user-centered, ethnographic perspective highlights for design team and clients alike the need to understand the breadth of human experience that occurs within and around built environments. 

    Ashley Flores

    Education Strategist, HKS

    Ashley Flores is the Education Strategist at HKS, a global architecture and design firm. She leverages her experience as teacher, district administrator, and planner to advance teaching and learning through the built environment. Prior to HKS, Ashley served as Director of Planning and Special Projects at the Dallas Independent School District and led the development and early implementation of the district's personalized learning initiative, a model for spurring innovation in a large urban district. She earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in the Business Honors Program and a Bachelor of Arts in the Plan II Honors Program at The University of Texas at Austin as well as a Master of Education in Education Policy and Management at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

  • Planning Ahead to Age at Home

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    Understand how homeowners can spend less money in the long term while aging in their homes by planning home upgrades that meet the Standards of Universal Design and Accessibility ahead of time.

    Research shows 73-88% of Baby Boomers in America want to age in their homes, yet few residences are prepared to accommodate long-term needs. This generation will live 10-15 years longer than previous generations, so Baby Boomers must stay healthy 10-15 years longer. To house healthier older adults, homes must accommodate physical needs for a lifetime. Preparing ahead is a key element in this equation. In today’s world, people are motivated by initiatives that save time, energy and money. People spend money in order to save money long term. This webinar focuses on how homeowners can spend less money in the long term while aging in their homes by planning home upgrades that meet the Standards of Universal Design and Accessibility ahead of time. A monetary value equation is presented, supporting that the most economical choice is to age in a home designed for multi-generational use. This research was made possible thanks to the ASID Foundation Irene Winifred Eno Grant

    Learning Objectives

    1. Learn about the long-term housing crisis generated by the extended life expectancy of healthy Baby Boomers
    2. Understand the predominant preference to age at home and the importance of planning ahead in order to prepare a lifelong multi-generational living environment
    3. Learn how to integrate the standards of Universal Design and Accessibility into the design elements of residential upgrades
    4. Discover the support systems needed by individuals to remain active in their communities while aging at home
    5. Review the key components of housing and healthcare presented as cost comparisons for aging at home versus aging in an assisted living facility

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-104947; 1 CEU | HSW     Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    Access periodOne year from registration date.

    Lisa Bonneville, FASID

    Principal, Bonneville Design

    Lisa Bonneville, FASID is a passionate interior designer with a vision to create an accessible world, one home at a time. For over 36 years, she has managed her award-winning firm, Bonneville Design, in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts, serving a residential, corporate, healthcare and retail clientele. She continues to work with many of her original clients, creating new homes for them through upgrades and careful planning on new construction to achieve lifelong living environments. Her inspired approach to the process of spatial planning and aesthetic impact provide fresh creative solutions on every project. She forms supportive teams, encourages collaboration, and improves outcomes by ensuring timely and transparent communication. This distinctive approach, coupled with a high level of organization and project management expertise, makes her a highly valued resource to her clients, vendors, and colleagues in the trade.

    Always a strong advocate for the physically and mentally challenged, Bonneville incorporates the standards of Universal Design into her project solutions and works with clients to heighten awareness of the importance of safety and mobility within the home while achieving optimum living environments for themselves, their family members, and friends. She is a 2014 recipient of the ASID Foundation’s Irene Winifred Eno Grant for the research project “Developing a Cost Comparison Tool for Planning Ahead to Age in a Home Designed to the Standards of Universal Design and Accessibility vs. Moving Into an Assisted Living Facility,” and in 2008 was inducted into the New England Design Hall of Fame. She’s the author of The Safe Home, Designing for Safety in the Home (2007).

  • Stand Up to Work: Applying Workplace Environment Research to Practice

    Contains 13 Component(s)

    In this course you’ll hear from the research team behind the Stand Up to Work study, a multidisciplinary project examining the effects of adjustable workstations in an office environment.

    In this course you’ll hear from the research team behind the Stand Up to Work study, a multidisciplinary project examining the effects of adjustable workstations in an office environment. See how you can apply the research findings in your design practice, with insight into effective strategies to help combat the health challenges posed by today’s office environments. This course and related study are supported by the ASID Foundation’s Transform Grant

    Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the health benefits of minimizing sedentary behavior
    2. Describe how adjustable workstations contribute to health promoting office environments
    3. Discuss the impact of workstation modification on worker productivity, communication, and physical and social well-being
    4. Explain how workplace academic research can inform and influence design practices

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-106304; 1 CEU | HSW    Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDSUTW; 1 LU

    Access period: One year from registration date.

  • Understanding the Effect of Surface Color & Design on the User's Physical, Mental & Social Wellbeing

    Contains 5 Component(s)

    Learn about the most significant requirements to consider during the interior surface selection process, including materiality, meaning, message, and maintenance.

    Surface color and design play an integral role in all interior spaces. Interior surfaces are the point of interaction between users and their environment, connecting the visual and physical worlds. You’ll learn about the most significant requirements to consider during the selection process, including materiality, meaning, message, and maintenance, to help guide you in implementing wise choices for all interior surfaces. This course is supported by WilsonArt

    Learning Objectives

    1. Materiality – Identify physical qualities of materials in the built environment that affect the physical, mental, and social wellbeing among users.
    2. Meaning – Understand perception, meaning, and human responses for developing effective design strategies.
    3. Message – Explore relevance and importance of how surfaces impact the senses and strategies for implementation.
    4. Maintenance - Evaluate surface color and design for optimum material performance goals.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-107082; 1 CEU | HSW     Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    AIA Course Number: ASIDSURFCOLOR; 1 LU | HSW 

    Access period: One year from registration date.

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  • What is the Future of Intelligent Homes and Communities?

    Contains 9 Component(s)

    This course will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on this issue. This seminar was recorded as part of the 2015 Impact Summit.

    This course will introduce interior designers, architects, and design students to expert panelists across government, industry, design, technology, and standards, who share their field perspectives on this issue. This seminar was recorded as part of the 2015 Impact Summit.

    Central discussion: The Lake Nona Medical City is surrounded by education facilities, five million square feet of commercial and retail space, and a mix of residential options within the 7,000-acre master-planned community – reserving forty percent of the community for open green space and lakes.

    In this session, expert panelists across healthcare, design, technology and media will engage each other and the audience to explore insights this community model can offer to the future of smart, “intelligent” commercial and residential design.

    Learning Objectives

    1. Evaluate the relationship between buildings, communities, and amenities in terms of physical, mental, psychological, and ecological health.
    2. Recognize the potential holistic health benefits of intelligent, network-enabled sensor devices in a home or commercial building.
    3. Interpret and integrate innovative design solutions for “connected” communities.
    4. Recognize cross-sector terminology related to health and wellness oriented design.

    IDCEC Course Number: CC-105685R1; 1 CEU | HSW    Note: ASID will report CEUs earned to IDCEC on your behalf.

    Access period: One year from registration date.